The mystic feminine

06:00 PM

Project Otenga
Ahmedabad University, Office Campus, Commerce Six Crossroads, Ahmedabad, India 380009

Contributions (entry fee) for the performance at Project Otenga: Rs. 300

2018-10-07 18:00:00 2018-10-07 05:30:00 Asia/Kolkata The mystic feminine

Vithu Mazha – Shruthi Vishwanath presents known and unknown poems of the women warikari poets.

The Mystic Feminine

An exploration of the feminine in mystic poetry through text and song.
The feminine voice in the mystic has traditionally been less known, because of deep rooted patriarchy in our societies. Despite that, women (and men) have written mystic songs that have endured the test of time. How do women’s voices come through, and some men? And what does it reflect on society then and now?

The Warikari tradition is a 13th century, spiritual Bhakti tradition that recognises male and female saint-poets, spanning a period of over 500 years. The founding saints of this tradition claimed back the space of spirituality as an inclusive one for everybody, at a time when the scriptures were known to only the upper castes. The warikari tradition spoke of a oneness of being, non-duality, and did it all in Marathi. The poems they sang were inspired by the ‘ovi’ metre, a traditional folk metre that women sang in while grinding grain.

While the warikari tradition is a living one, the poetry of the women saints has been ignored over the years. The poems are heart-wrenchingly relevant to our present rhetoric. The challenge to a singular idea of what a devotional practice should be like, or who should be entitled to its privilege is a debate that is alive in India today.

Inspired by the translations of Dr. Jacqui Daukes, Shruthi set out to compose and record these poems, using both traditional musical idioms of the abhang, and going beyond. The composition work is currently being supported by the India Foundation for the Arts, under the Arts Practice program.

The Artist:
Shruthi Vishwanath is a musician, composer and educator. Trained extensively in Carnatic music, her quest for a music that was more true to her led her to the works of Kabir, and the mystic poets. She now explores the intersections of classical and folk, intellectual and visceral by singing the works of poets from across the subcontinent in different forms of music.

Her interpretations of abhangs have resulted in several new revivals of unknown works, especially of women saints. Shruthi has performed at venues and festivals across India and abroad. Some key performances include the Kabir Festival of Mumbai, Malwa Kabir Yatra, NCPA, India Habitat Centre, an IFA showcase series in Singapore, and at Raga Forum for Indian Music Vienna
Roselle tea and bitings will be served complimentary during the event.

Source: Facebook

Project Otenga
Ahmedabad University, Office Campus, Commerce Six Crossroads, Ahmedabad, India 380009

Creativeyatra.com info@creativeyatra.com

Vithu Mazha – Shruthi Vishwanath presents known and unknown poems of the women warikari poets.

The Mystic Feminine

An exploration of the feminine in mystic poetry through text and song.
The feminine voice in the mystic has traditionally been less known, because of deep rooted patriarchy in our societies. Despite that, women (and men) have written mystic songs that have endured the test of time. How do women’s voices come through, and some men? And what does it reflect on society then and now?

The Warikari tradition is a 13th century, spiritual Bhakti tradition that recognises male and female saint-poets, spanning a period of over 500 years. The founding saints of this tradition claimed back the space of spirituality as an inclusive one for everybody, at a time when the scriptures were known to only the upper castes. The warikari tradition spoke of a oneness of being, non-duality, and did it all in Marathi. The poems they sang were inspired by the ‘ovi’ metre, a traditional folk metre that women sang in while grinding grain.

While the warikari tradition is a living one, the poetry of the women saints has been ignored over the years. The poems are heart-wrenchingly relevant to our present rhetoric. The challenge to a singular idea of what a devotional practice should be like, or who should be entitled to its privilege is a debate that is alive in India today.

Inspired by the translations of Dr. Jacqui Daukes, Shruthi set out to compose and record these poems, using both traditional musical idioms of the abhang, and going beyond. The composition work is currently being supported by the India Foundation for the Arts, under the Arts Practice program.

The Artist:
Shruthi Vishwanath is a musician, composer and educator. Trained extensively in Carnatic music, her quest for a music that was more true to her led her to the works of Kabir, and the mystic poets. She now explores the intersections of classical and folk, intellectual and visceral by singing the works of poets from across the subcontinent in different forms of music.

Her interpretations of abhangs have resulted in several new revivals of unknown works, especially of women saints. Shruthi has performed at venues and festivals across India and abroad. Some key performances include the Kabir Festival of Mumbai, Malwa Kabir Yatra, NCPA, India Habitat Centre, an IFA showcase series in Singapore, and at Raga Forum for Indian Music Vienna
Roselle tea and bitings will be served complimentary during the event.

Source: Facebook




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