6th N.C. MEHTA Memorial Lecture on Indian Miniature Paintings

05:30 PM - 08:30 PM

Lalbhai Dalpatbhai Museum & N.C. Mehta Gallery, Nr. Gujarat University, Navarangpura, Ahmedabad, India 380009

Open for all

2017-11-23 17:30:00 2017-11-23 20:30:00 Asia/Kolkata 6th N.C. MEHTA Memorial Lecture on Indian Miniature Paintings

The 6th N.C. MEHTA MEMORIAL LECTURE ON INDIAN MINIATURE PAINTINGS.

Krishna/Arjun, God/Man, Eternity/Time, Painting/Song: Reading Some Miniature Paintings about The Gita from Mewar (1680-1698), to be delivered by The Eminent Literary Scholar, Prof. Alok Bhalla.

This talk is a critical reading of selected Gita miniatures from a collection of 570 paintings from Mewar. These miniature paintings are unprecedented in Indian art history. This set of folios itself is part of about 5500 illustrations of the Mahabharata painted in 1680-94 and commissioned by Rana Jai Singh. The artist was, perhaps, Allah Baksh. The Mewari translation of each verse is by Pandit Kisandas. The paintings of the Mahabharata are horizontal indicating the story’s movement from a mythic beginning to a cataclysmic end. The Gita paintings are vertical (size 37/24 cm). The Gita does not offer a linear argument which moves logically towards a conclusion, but is a visionary break in the Mahabharata’s narrative of time, change and suffering. For the artist, every shloka is a unique revelation requiring its own visual image. He has no scholarly compulsion to isolate one verse as the Gita’s ‘essence’ offering an unambiguous answer to Arjuna’s fundamental question: How should we live?

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Lalbhai Dalpatbhai Museum & N.C. Mehta Gallery, Nr. Gujarat University, Navarangpura, Ahmedabad, India 380009

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The 6th N.C. MEHTA MEMORIAL LECTURE ON INDIAN MINIATURE PAINTINGS.

Krishna/Arjun, God/Man, Eternity/Time, Painting/Song: Reading Some Miniature Paintings about The Gita from Mewar (1680-1698), to be delivered by The Eminent Literary Scholar, Prof. Alok Bhalla.

This talk is a critical reading of selected Gita miniatures from a collection of 570 paintings from Mewar. These miniature paintings are unprecedented in Indian art history. This set of folios itself is part of about 5500 illustrations of the Mahabharata painted in 1680-94 and commissioned by Rana Jai Singh. The artist was, perhaps, Allah Baksh. The Mewari translation of each verse is by Pandit Kisandas. The paintings of the Mahabharata are horizontal indicating the story’s movement from a mythic beginning to a cataclysmic end. The Gita paintings are vertical (size 37/24 cm). The Gita does not offer a linear argument which moves logically towards a conclusion, but is a visionary break in the Mahabharata’s narrative of time, change and suffering. For the artist, every shloka is a unique revelation requiring its own visual image. He has no scholarly compulsion to isolate one verse as the Gita’s ‘essence’ offering an unambiguous answer to Arjuna’s fundamental question: How should we live?

Source: Facebook




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